Documenting Fiduciary Plan Management Responsibilities

Nov 28, 2022

ERISA states that every plan document must identify a “Named Fiduciary” to be the individual or entity serving as the primary fiduciary responsible for all plan management activities (e.g., President, Plan Administrator, The Company (BOD), or another individual or entity).

The Named Fiduciary can delegate nearly all plan management responsibilities to “co-fiduciaries”; however, they must retain the responsibility to regularly monitor the prudent management of these co-fiduciaries (e.g., individuals who comprise a plan steering committee or others who impact plan decision making).

Having a Committee Charter is very beneficial when delegating any fiduciary responsibilities to co-fiduciaries.

A Committee Charter documents the delegation of the specified plan management responsibilities, as well as plan practices and procedures, to plan co-fiduciaries. A board resolution adopting the committee is also helpful (if there is no BOD or other controlling entity, an adoption resolution is not necessary). Your financial professional can assist with a sample Committee Charter, and related documents, that can be easily edited to suit your needs.

Co-fiduciary Acceptance, and Resignation signatures, although not specifically required by ERISA, are quite important. The fiduciary acceptance (by signature) specifies the specific responsibility delegations. Resignation signatures are important as well as they can remove the fiduciary from further post resignation liability. ERISA holds that if a co-fiduciary (e.g., Committee member) leaves the Committee, but does not leave the company, they remain liable for the actions of the remaining co-fiduciaries (committee members) unless they sign a resignation statement (also available via your financial professional). Finally, resigning fiduciaries need to follow plan procedures and make certain that another fiduciary is carrying out any responsibilities left behind that are required for prudent plan management. It is critical that a plan has appropriate fiduciaries in place so that it can continue operations and participants have a way to interact with the plan.

See the following link for the DOL’s stated positions on these and other fiduciary responsibilities:

https://www.dol.gov/sites/dolgov/files/ebsa/about-ebsa/our-activities/resource-center/publications/meeting-your-fiduciary-responsibilities.pdf

For more information, please contact Preston Englund at 402-461-4893 or .

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The information given herein is taken from sources that IFP Advisors, LLC, dba Independent Financial Partners (IFP), IFP Securities LLC, dba Independent Financial Partners (IFP), and it advisors believe to be reliable, but it is not guaranteed by us as to accuracy or completeness. This is for informational purposes only and in no event should be construed as an offer to sell or solicitation of an offer to buy any securities or products. Please consult your tax and/or legal advisor before implementing any tax and/or legal related strategies mentioned in this publication as IFP does not provide tax and/or legal advice. Opinions expressed are subject to change without notice and do not take into account the particular investment objectives, financial situation, or needs of individual investors. Prepared by 3rd party.

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